In a study published in 2021, Hashicorp revealed that 86% of companies surveyed plan on adopting a multi-cloud strategy within the next two years.

The reason for this is that moving from on-premise to the multi cloud makes infrastructure more flexible and increases redundancy.

If you are considering migrating your infrastructure to the multi cloud, you will first need to assess your own architecture – define the status of your application(s) and what you expect from this migration, for instance improving security, performance, reliability, usage costs, etc.

The outcome of this assessment will then help you determine the multi-cloud strategy that will best fit your needs and future ambitions.

Multi-cloud cloudification

In this configuration, an application is initially hosted on-premise. Migration makes it possible to increase capacity by benefitting from the additional features of other cloud service providers (CSP), instead of increasing capacity on-site.

In the example below, the application now relies on Scaleway’s Object Storage for storing data and AWS’ Dynamodb for processing.

Multicloud cloudification
multi-cloud cloudification

By adopting this strategy, you can take advantage of what the cloud has to offer and improve the availability and reliability of your application, all the while reducing your reliance on a single cloud provider.

Multi-cloud relocation

In a multi-cloud relocation strategy, an on-premise application is first migrated to cloud platform A, then configured so that it can use the services offered by cloud platform B. An application does not need to undergo any changes for this type of migration.

This strategy allows businesses to improve productivity without having to transform their architecture or on-site capital investment. Relying on the multi cloud is also a way to avoid depending on a single CSP.

In the below example, the application uses an Enterprise Instance from Scaleway for hosting, and AWS for data storage.

multi-cloud relocation
multi-cloud relocation

Multi-cloud refactoring

Choosing multi-cloud refactoring means that a business has already decided to implement a multi-cloud strategy, but their application is too big for the optimizations offered by various cloud providers. The application must be redesigned into smaller components that are individually optimized before being deployed on several cloud platforms.

This way, the application becomes more agile and responds better to workload variations, thus taking full advantage of the improved productivity offered by using multiple CSPs.

In the below example, the application was restructured into two components that are hosted by two different providers.

Multi-cloud refactoring
Multi-cloud refactoring

To implement this strategy requires a significant amount of work, but effort will pay off via the following benefits: increased scalability and performance for your application, as well as a broader range of products and services.

Multi-cloud rebinding

Similarly to multi-cloud refactoring, this strategy requires compartmentalizing an application into several components. However, in the case of rebinding, an application will only be partially deployed into several different cloud environments. This way, the application will stay up and running even if one of the cloud platforms were to fail.

This configuration guarantees the availability of the application, and prevents high impact failures from affecting your business and revenue.

In the below example, the application was divided into two different components. Component A remains on-premise, while component B has been migrated to two cloud platforms. In this type of infrastructure, the components are linked together by a Load Balancer, which is able to prevent downtime by transferring workloads from one platform to another in case of a failure.

Multi-cloud rebinding
Multi-cloud rebinding

Multi-cloud rebinding with cloud brokerage

The only difference between this strategy and multi-cloud rebinding is the use of a cloud broker instead of a load balancer.

A cloud broker acts as an intermediary between the CSP and the user. Just like a bank broker, it assesses the different providers in order to choose the one that best fits your needs, your market, and your budget.

Multi-cloud rebinding with cloud brokerage
Multi-cloud rebinding with cloud brokerage

Multi-application modernization

Certain organizations tend to create on-premise applications in the hopes of improving application management and coherence, as well as cost management. However, in reality, these shared components are not as coherent as expected, and end up costing more.

As part of this modernization strategy, applications are no longer deployed on-premise as a rule, but individually and on different platforms. You can therefore identify the specific needs of each component, find solutions that work for all of them, and reduce operational costs by performing optimizations.

Multi-application modernization
Multi-application modernization


Nowadays, designing and building your infrastructure by relying on several cloud providers increases the flexibility and performance of your applications. The advantages of a multi-cloud strategy are undeniable.

Before initiating one of the strategies we have been discussing, we suggest that you:

  • Identify the applications in your organization which are best suited for a multi-cloud environment, such as cloud-native applications
  • Analyze your entire network, then identify the cloud service and provider that best meet your specific needs
  • Automate the maintenance tasks and low-level monitoring
  • Analyze the normalization of the policies that are automatically applied to each cloud environment

To know more about multi-cloud